Being energy

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I have never been one much for metaphysical investigation, nor overly ponderous or scholarly about formal philosophy studies, but I am inching toward these areas, alongside deeper inquiry into physical and chemical sciences and physics, because suddenly these concepts, about which I know so little, have triggered something in my brain that is larger than idle curiosity.

As I wrote the other day, a book on “psychic phenomena”, which I had decided to read only because it sat untouched on my bookshelf for the last decade (how and why these kinds of books even came into my possession is something I’ve forgotten; I want to say that I received them from an ex, with whom I shared long-running jokes about my supposed psychic abilities), sparked a real interest in thoughts being things, about the extension of the “bodily, physical reality in the here and now”.

The psychic book, Awakening Your Psychic Powers, started with the argument that all things are interconnected – indicating that findings in quantum and subatomic physics (the part that most excited me) or thinking on the universal nature of spirituality (if one were to study all world religions and belief systems) as reflected in the philosophia perennis. This interconnectedness leads to a fundament of focusing and channeling psychic ability: Oneness, and accepting Oneness. It sounds New Agey and mystical, but if we were to cease seeing things as discrete, separate entities and instead accept everything as part of an interconnected ecosystem, as modern western physics does at the subatomic level, the physical boundaries we’ve concocted would fall. Spiritually, it argues, there are no boundaries in the first place.

“It is much easier for a consciousness rooted in a spiritual identity that exists beyond the constraints of time and space to accept the functioning of psychic ability as a natural talent. Not only does such a shift in identity make psychic functioning more natural, but it provides us with other needed benefits as well.”

In Einstein’s theory of relativity, “thingness” disappears as mass is equated with energy. “Things” become waves of energy/patterns. “Not only is everything on earth interconnected, everything is really the same thing – energy moving about and taking different forms. And that is one way to begin to imagine what is meant by the Oneness that lies behind visible creation.”

If we are to accept this, then something like psychic phenomena seems less implausible and more about a way of tuning in, perceiving and seeing.

It’s not what we thought…

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Everything turns out, in time, not to be what we thought it was.

Women’s fertility, thought to hit a precipitous slide downward from the age of 27 – or 35 – or some other number conjured up by dubious science, may decline in general/on average. But then it turns out fertility is not quite that simple.

“But it’s no wonder we’re so easily panicked. The fearful narrative around women’s fertility fits with a broader theme that’s become all too common as women have gained economic independence over the last several decades: we’re going to pay for our equality. Mothers going to work in the 1980’s were told they were subjecting their kids to an epidemic of sexual abuse at daycare centers. In 1986, Newsweek reported that 40-year-old single women were “more likely to be killed by a terrorist” than find a husband. These stories and many more like them, of course, are completely false. Perhaps the best way to fight the panic is to question those who’ve made a business of selling it.”

Pregnancy after 40 is becoming quite common. In fact, in the UK at least, the number of over-40 pregnancies outnumbers the under-30 pregnancies for the first time in 70 years.

I lived for years in Iceland, where it is quite common to have children (many, in fact) when you’re quite young (late teens/early 20s). This is seen as the norm. When a non-Icelandic friend lived in Iceland, everyone around her hounded her about having a baby before she was an “old hag” (meaning mid-20s, I guess???). She did not have a child until she moved to Denmark, and by then she was in her late 20s. The Danes, though, insisted that she was “so young” to be having a child, and all the other women in her maternity ward had at least ten years on her.

And this very pressing issue – fertility – reminds me not only that life goes on but also that, as it does, there are so many other things we don’t know shit about but pretend to (or to trust experts about them): Addiction, aging, the brain, radiation, education, the powerhouse Japan was supposed to be… or even pasta. Nothing is definitive – it keeps changing as the environment around it changes. We really don’t know anything – even what consciousness means.

The same can be said of people, but that’s another and different challenge.